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MOUNTAIN OF UTHE: Campus Security officer Keith Uthe and the ADAPT pamphlets.
Mukul Ahuja/The Gauntlet

ADAPT team pamphlets campus

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The fight against alcohol and drugs on campus has recruited a new team. The Alcohol and Drug Awareness Prevention Team launched its first project three weeks ago by publishing out three new pamphlets promoting awareness about alcohol, illegal drugs and rape drugs.

Two pamphlets emphasize that students can choose about drugs and alcohol. They proceed to highlight responsible drinking, the risks of use and abuse, one's legal responsibilities regarding drugs and alcohol, and phone numbers students can call if they need assistance or treatment. The third pamphlet explains rape drugs are and how to protect against them.

"This [the pamphlets] is the first visual thing to show that we as a committee have accomplished something," said Campus Security Officer Keith Uthe.
ADAPT formed 16 months ago at Uthe's suggestion. He wanted to connect the organizations on campus who disseminate information about alcohol and drugs to students.

"The initial idea was to try and get a consistent message to the students about drugs and alcohol through a variety of agencies," said Uthe. Groups such as University Health Services, Residence and Counselling Services, the Students' Union and the Health Outreach Team are involved, Uthe added.

ADAPT also puts out a calendar of teaching and extracurricular non-alcoholic activities occurring on campus for the Fall and Winter semesters.
For the pamphlets, Uthe gathered information from sources such as the Internet, AADAC and the Calgary Police Service. He put together the information he felt was relevant. The other ADAPT members then approved the pamphlet content.

"From start to finish, it took about a year to get the pamphlet done," said Uthe.

Wilf Hill, a member of Residence Services, said adapt's next main goal is to recruit students.

"We want student volunteers, perhaps a representative of the SU and a few students-at-large to sit in on the meetings and provide an unbiased and non-political view," he said.

One of the programs in place to attract students include a residence leader training course about substance abuse, Hill added.

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