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Careers Day invades Jack Simpson

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Students were given a chance to face their futures this past Monday as the annual Careers Day was held at the University of Calgary.

Hosted by AIESEC, an international student organization
focusing on student exchange, Careers Day gave students the opportunity to meet with a range of company representatives.

"It's basically a large job fair," said Careers Day Organizing Committee President Fonda Lee. "Companies set up booths for students to peruse the possibilities they have in the job market."

Organized by a six-member student committee, over 100 companies from various fields met in the Jack Simpson Gymnasium to talk with students about options available to them after completing their education.

"[Careers Day] provides a great chance for students to directly interact with company representatives," said Lee. "It also provides valuable background information for planning their future career moves."

The theme of this year's Careers Day was "The Future Awaits...", which, according to Lee, communicates the essence of Careers Day.

"Our theme is basically about planning ahead for your future," said Lee. "It's the idea of how the fast pace of the working environment makes it necessary."

Although a large number of companies participated in Careers Day, some students thought the event would benefit from a greater diversity.

"I think it's a lot more valuable to management students," said fourth-year Science student Jennifer Moody. "There's not much for science or health students."

However, other students found Careers Day prompted them to give greater consideration to their future.

"I have a better view of what I'm going to do in my specific field," said first-year General Studies student Mahyar Khosravi. "[Careers Day] helped me to make a general decision in what I'm interested in, and the types of fields available."

Careers Day also gave companies a chance to promote themselves to students who may become prospective employees.

"I think it is a great venue for a company to profile its benefits and to meet future employees," said Career Information Coordinator for the Chartered Accountants of Alberta Korey Cherneski. "I am able to present a profile of the CA industry, and the benefits of choosing this industry as a professional choice."

Some company representatives felt Careers Day lacked proper
promotion, preventing a better turnout.

"A lot of students aren't aware that we are here today because there was little promotion," said Marketing Administrator Vanessa Everett. "Basically, I'm very disappointed."

Nevertheless, those involved hope Careers Day served the needs of both students and the companies involved in its activities by providing a mix of information and exposure.

"Careers Day is a great way for us to show our presence in support of the students," said Marriott Hotel Director of Human Resources Mona Bechervaise. "But we hope to provide awareness more than anything else."

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